Tribal politics must cease after the ‘handshake’

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President Uhuru Kenyatta and NASA leader Raila Odinga during their meeting at Harambee House, Nairobi where they agreed to work together to restore peace and unity.FILE PHOTO
President Uhuru Kenyatta and NASA leader Raila Odinga during their meeting at Harambee House, Nairobi where they agreed to work together to restore peace and unity.FILE PHOTO

After the handshake comes the effects, that’s what Kenyans expect and what everyone still expects to take shape in the immediate future. The truce between President Uhuru Kenyatta and opposition leader Raila Odinga caught many by surprise, especially political pundits who fed on the controversial political gimmicks since early last year when campaigns heated up. In the many chronicles that signal the nation’s weak lines, politics and tribalism are united in a rather tempestous matrimony, given that politicians use tribal politics to divide and conquer, or as sympathizers may see it, they use tribal politics to divide and administer authority.

Tribalism to some grows without notice and has been gradually and steadily increasing throughout the years, like the macroevolution of propaganda. Others view it as a time bomb that explodes time and time again and recedes like ocean waves-obviously not during a serene day-and that ‘time and time again’ is during the heated political season, mostly the period preceding general elections. According to the latter view, politicians will use any means possible to win over support, even inciting tribes against tribes. There is much truth in this view, as much as the former view, it all depends on the lens used. The truth, however, remains that tribal divisions have been spurred by a lack of politics of development, one that lacks an agenda, by supposed leaders who even don’t know what the main agenda for Kenyans is. Ask any politician what is the agenda to be solved in Kenya, either they can’t come up with an answer, or they’ll set a snare for their deceitful feet when they inevitably point out corruption is the main agenda.

After the handshake and a rousing address by President Kenyatta in parliament during the state of the nation address, many hearts were stirred and the issues we thought would never settle were dealt with, mainly, politics of divisions, albeit through words. As President Kenyatta and Babu Owino shook hands, it definitely showed the other side of leaders we wish had prevailed throughout the general elections. Tribal politics should also be a monument in history, not one to remember though, but one to shove six feet under. It should provide an opportunity for Kenyans to shun aligning our interests and affiliations according to the tribes we hail from. A united front shouldn’t be underestimated, and Kenyans working on a united front, aside from tribal fronts, can accomplish a lot. This is all of us hoping tribal gimmicks won’t ever pop up again, let’s say it’s a challenge to our leaders first.