Reasons that lead to street children

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A street child looking for food in garbage
A street child looking for food in garbage

The rate of children living in streets in Kenya is increasing is alarming. High percentages of children living in streets are teenagers, which are starting at the age of thirteen years to nineteen years.

In Bungoma County, most of children living in the streets are in Bungoma town specifically at Kanduyi.

These Children have different reasons as to why they live in streets and not at home.

Domestic violence and violation of children rights by parents and guardians made the children reach a decision of staying in the streets. Some of the children have claimed that most of their parents are alcoholics making them to be violent towards them. As a result they tend to make wrong accusations towards the children and also beating them.

Poor relationships between children and parents also increase the percentage of children living in streets. Parents need to handle children with care as they are in a crucial stage of human development. Maintaining a good parent-children relationship can be a one way of reducing the high number of children running away from home to go and stay in the streets. Thus parents need to be so sensitive when handling issues with their children.

Streets are not worth environment for children development. This is because children feed on dirty food which they pick in garbage and dustbins. They also sniff glue which they claim make them strong, keep them warm, make their bodies resistant to pain and also they claim of not feeling hungry after sniffing glue. However, glue has negative effects to children. These effects include insensitivity of nerve cells, addiction and chest pains.

The society should be sensitive in handling children. More so, parents and guardians need to be more sensitive when dealing with children. It is only through this that we will be able to reduce high rate of children living in streets. Parental care and love is very important to children.

By Diana Wangila